Airbrush tutorial, tips for better airbrushing – Short Guide Plastic Models

Airbrush tutorial, tips for better airbrushing – Short Guide Plastic Models


Hello, friends. Today’s short guide is about basics of airbrushing and spraying larger areas. I mostly paint my models with Tamiya acrylic colors. In this video, I am using olive color for illustrative purposes. However, if you think of diluting the paint with water, then quickly forget it. You will never achieve perfect results with water. I rather use original Tamiya X-20A thinner, but you can use ordinary ethanol too. I do not know the precise thinning ratio because all the shades require a different amount of thinner, and it depends on the size of airbrush nozzle too. Now, I add the magical ingredient, which is a paint retarder agent. Just a few drops. I use Tamiya Retarder to prolong paints drying time and to avoid forming paint dust on the model’s surface. And now let’s go to work with the airbrush. Most of the classic airbrushes are double action. It means that by moving the trigger forward and backward, you control the amount of paint and diameter of sprayed circle, and by pressing and releasing the trigger, you regulate the pressure. Both actions must be properly combined. Before you start spraying, it is good to check paint dilution on a piece of plastic plate. Which are the most common mistakes? If I pull the trigger toward myself, then there is the maximum amount of paint in the nozzle and low pressure. The result is that the paint splatters. Another mistake. The quantity of paint is fine, but I have big pressure over 2.5 bars, which blows the paint away. The result is that the paint spills to all the directions. Now we have the correct pressure of 2 bars and a reasonable amount of paint, but it is too much diluted. I try to make a consistent layer. The result is that the paint spills to all directions and creates waves. Now the absolute opposite. The paint is poured directly from the can without dilution. The result is that the first layer coats everything, but it creates an inconsistent coarse layer. This is how it looks like in detail. Ok, I showed you the basic mistakes, but the question is how to do it correctly? Do not try to coat the plane with just one layer. Usually, I spray 3 or more very thin layers. The first layer should be sprayed only lightly and it should stay very transparent. Thus, you create a base coat for the next layer. The next one will adhere to the model’s surface much better and the paint will not spill away. The second layer already partially covers the gray plastic The third layer should be already the final one, but it isn’t still fully opaque. Only the fourth finishing layer coats everything properly. Paint dries after 10 minutes, but if you use a hair dryer, you can apply another layer already after a few seconds. The coat of paint is perfectly smooth, not coarse. Only sometimes it is suitable to use a retarder. Some paints dry too fast and droplets of paint dry before reaching the model’s surface, which creates a coarse layer of paint. You do not need to throw the plastic plate away when the paint dries. Just use technical alcohol and wash it with a piece of cloth. I often do a paint consistency check if it is well diluted. I smear a drop of paint on a plastic plate and if it is transparent and looks like a watercolor, then it’s ok. If it is opaque and adheres to the plastic plate, then it is wrongly diluted and it is going to form paint splatters during airbrushing. And that’s all for today. I hope this tutorial is going to help you improve your own airbrushing skills. Good luck and thanks for watching.

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