Makes a Difference (S2, E6) | AT THE MUSEUM

Makes a Difference (S2, E6) | AT THE MUSEUM


Karlos Carcamo, Framer: Alright, here I come. Karlos: Alright. I don’t think we’re going
to use drills for this. What’s that? Karlos: No drills for this. We’re just going
to do all hand screws. Karlos: Just go straight up. Got it? Karlos: Alright, we’re going to lean the painting out. Switch my hands. Michael Duffy, Paintings Conservator: We’re
going to go down now. Karlos: Came off with the shim. Kate Lewis, The Agnes Gund Chief Conservator: But Anny, I know you were looking at some of the cracks here. Anny, Senior Paintings Conservator: Yeah, there’s cracks here and here, but they’ve been like that for a long time, so I don’t think they’re worse, but we’ll do
an inspection under the microscope to make sure that things are stable. Kate: But it’s just kind of cool seeing those edges. Anny: Yeah, I agree with you, the ground,
the ground. Kate: I don’t know- Michael: It is, yeah, because it gives you
more of a sense of how he worked, too. Kate: Yeah, even though it’s not even. Anny: And also how he wanted to leave it exposed. Kate: How exciting! Anny: Hm? Kate: How exciting! Anny: I know! Hunter Webb, Projectionist: This is a silent film for our first film back. I’m looking forward to getting back into
the regular screening, because… I’m about wired out. I’ve rewired everything you could basically see. That whole sound rack was re-wired and moved. I ran new lines to the stage, much cleaner, much faster… easier… The daily shows are the most fun. Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Film: As a film curator, you don’t put on the screen what you haven’t yourself seen and that’s something that I take seriously,
and my colleagues take very seriously. Anne: So, I preview everything that is going
into film exhibitions that I’m working on. Most of the time, I know the works, it’s
really a matter of previewing a print or some other format for its condition. Michael: You can see this little white spot here, and this white spot in the mouth where the paint was missing, and it’s been filled with a white material, and now I’m just retouching to match the color of the face. Michael: I just noticed these little cracks,
like the line on her neck. Diana Hartman, David Booth Fellow in Paintings Conservation: Oh yeah, Mmhm. Michael: And these lines got a little like- Diana: And there’s the one in his eye. Michael: Oh yeah. Right… that one? Diana: That one. Michael: So now we’re really noticing just
these tiny, little details that are… Diana: We’re nitpicky. Michael: Yes. Michael: It’s more typical we each, kind of, have our own project, but in this case, there’s so much to do and not so much time, that we’re taking the opportunity to work side-by-side. John Driscoll, Artist: Well, this works exactly as planned. We might want to pin this…lid. Little rattle there. It seems to be in the middle. Phil Edelstein, Artist: Oh, while we’re talking, can we kick
down the top curtain? Paul DiPietro, Technical Manager, Audio Visual:
Yeah. John: It makes a difference. Also, I think for the performance, what
it does is it encloses the space, so you know you’re in a… it’s not a walk-around space. John: There is no loop. What will happen… Paul: So it will never repeat? It will just
keep going and going and going. John: No. You’ll hear familiar sounds, but
not in the same context again. Paul: Got it. Martha Joseph, Assistant Curator, Media
& Performance Art: Hey! Sounds good! John: This is it! Martha: Excellent. Cara Manes, Associate Curator, Painting & Sculpture: But I don’t like it on the slant either. Should we just try it thirty again just to get it off? Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis
Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture: Yeah, let’s go to the thirty from the wall again. Ann: Good. Check that orientation! Ann: Okay. I’m loving the Calder with the Fritsch. Cara: Me too. Ann: …as the transition, kind of. Cara: Right. Cara: Could we just try to see it just to
kind of move it out? To see if there’s any way like… Ann: To come left? Cara: Yeah, to just occupy that spot. Ann: Yeah. Yeah. Ann: Okay, you can hold it a sec. Ann: Nice, huh? Ann: So should we put it on a dolly? ‘Cause I’m going to want to try this everywhere. Esther Adler, Associate Curator, Drawings
and Prints: Can you put that one under that one? We’ve got four like that one, so these two
share the same… Esther: What is it? Perfect. Esther: Yeah, it’s gorgeous. Betye Saar, Artist: Oh, there I am! Christophe Cherix, The Robert Lehman Foundation
Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints: So we are now playing with size a little bit here. Betye: Yes, I like that. Yeah, that’s the
top of Black Girl’s Window. Christophe: I mean, but what we really like
is that you can see it from the atrium. Betye: Yeah. That’s the atrium, so when you’re on the other side, you can see it when you look from the entrance. Betye: Yeah. Betye: I wonder what I had in these boxes. Betye: Looks like junk, doesn’t it? Betye: Yeah, but I think it’s great that Black Girl’s Window is down there. Esther: That’s amazing. Betye: That’s really good. See, I planned it then! You know? Esther: Perfect. And then we thought, you’ll see what you think, but because you had the hand there, and then if you look in, just that part there,
we thought that was a nice connection. Betye: Very mysterious going in. Betye: You know I’m in love with other, and I like things to look differently, like you’re going into a dream, or something like that, or remembering a dream. So it, it attracts more than the visual. It attracts your other senses, so you have that feeling. Not everybody, but, you know, that’s my intent. Singers: ♫ Oooh–oooh ♫ Lana Hum, Director, Exhibition Design & Production:
You know what happens on Monday, Mark? Mark: Art’s coming, huh? Lana: That’s right.

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